The {Keira} Edit

{11.15.17}

 

 

meet keira

Arizona girl Keira Jones writes about her fair fashion journey on her blog, Style Me Fair, sharing reviews and tips on how to shop sustainably (perk: with discount codes for her favorite brands).  You can find Keira on Pinterest, Instagram, and Facebook @stylemefair.  Today she's with us, sharing five ethically-made staples she can't live without.

Keria polaroid.jpg

1. JOYN, Myra Brown Leather Crossbody Satchel, $150

2. ABLE, Hammered Circle Earrings, $30

3. Sseko Designs, Carmel Leather Stitched Ribbon Sandal, $65

4. Everlane, Double-Lined Silk V-Neck Cami, $65

5. Ten Thousand Villages, Essential Companion Tote, $40

 

1.

JOYN
Myra Brown Leather Crossbody Satchel
$150

  Photo by JOYN

Photo by JOYN

the stuff:

I received the Myra crossbody in the mail as a generous gift from JOYN, and I can tell you it's amazing. I receive endless compliments on it, and the quality is truly outstanding. The bag is made of beautiful recycled leather, and it's extremely durable-- plus it's the perfect size for fitting a wallet, sunglasses, keys and your phone (and a few lipsticks, of course!) The best part about JOYN bags are the beautiful block-printed fabrics incorporated into the inside of every bag--it makes each one so unique!  Use the discount code STYLEMEFAIR10 for 10% off your purchase.

 

the story:

JOYN has such an incredible story.  The founders live and work among their maker cooperatives. Not visit. They actually live there.  JOYN makers have access to full benefits, vocational training, maternity and paternity leave, on-site daycare and career development.  Plus, 100% of makers further their traditional education during work hours.  I love that all of JOYN's cotton fabrics are hand-woven--they didn’t give up on handwoven products even when that was the easier route.  Quality and artistry that shows!

  Photo by (and picturing) Keira

Photo by (and picturing) Keira


2.

ABLE
Hammered Circle Earrings
$30

  Photo by (and picturing!) Keira

Photo by (and picturing!) Keira

 

the stuff:

These hammered circle earrings from ABLE were one the first ethical fashion purchases I made, and I still wear them multiple times a week since they go with everything.  I always get complimented on them since they are unique, yet simple and elegant.  I love that they haven't tarnished one bit, despite hundreds of wears--and quite a few showers!  Want to snag a pair?  Use the code HIGHFIVE for $5 off your purchase!

the story:

Nashville-based ABLE is a lifestyle brand focused on ending generational poverty by working with women who have often overcome extraordinary circumstances.  I love that ABLE recently launched "accountABLE," a reporting system that designed to create true transparency into the social impact of the company's employment and manufacturing practices (particularly the impact on women).  

  Photo by @ livefashionable  (Instagram)

Photo by @livefashionable (Instagram)


3.

SSEKO DESIGNS
Carmel Leather Stitched Ribbon Sandal
$65

  Photo by (and picturing) Keira

Photo by (and picturing) Keira

 

the stuff:

One of the main principles in slow fashion is wearing your clothes multiple times, eliminating the need for excessive consumption. Sseko carries a variety of sandals designs, and many of them can be transformed into completely different sandals by switching out the straps for various patterns, sizes, and materials. You can also lace them multiple ways.  Right now I'm loving the tan spaghetti straps laced in a gladiator style, but I know that once I tire of this look, there are so many others to try.  These shoes are also so comfy and well-made. Living in Arizona means that I can practically wear sandals year round, so these have become a staple in my closet.

the story:

Where to even start... Sseko Designs is doing incredible things and paving the way in the ethical fashion industry. All of their products are made by bright young Ugandan women who have the goal of attending University. Sseko Designs has sent 87 young Ugandan women to University... and counting!  All their materials are sourced in East Africa, which allows them to pour back into the economy.  Sseko has the goal of empowering women in East Africa to make an income for themselves and succeed in business through a for-profit model.

  Photo by   Jenny Greenstein //  Your Soul Style

Photo by Jenny Greenstein // Your Soul Style


4.

EVERLANE
Double-Lined Silk V-Neck Cami
$65

  Photo by (and picturing) Keira

Photo by (and picturing) Keira

 

the stuff:

I am all about red this season!  It’s a great way to incorporate a fall color that can also transition smoothly into winter. This classic tank is made of silk, a delicate material that must be hand washed. At first the thought of washing this by hand after each wear was a bit daunting, but it was much easier than I anticipated! I’ve quickly learned that caring properly for your clothes is the key to ensuring they will stand the test of time. This is the perfect tank for work or the weekend. Very versatile, comfortable, and beautiful!

the story:

Everlane’s mission is “‘Radical Transparency."  For each clothing item they sell, Everlane breaks down exactly how much that item cost to make. I love this feature, and respect Everlane for telling me exactly how much they are profiting and how much the seamstress who made the item was paid. 

{Communelle editor's note:  while we love that Everlane has helped to change the conversation about transparency, we were surprised to discover that H&M is actually more transparent than Everlane.  Pricing transparency is great, but we want supply chain transparency, too!}


5.

Ten Thousand Villages
Essential Companion Tote
$40

  Photo by Keira

Photo by Keira

 

the stuff:

This basket was beautifully handcrafted from palm leaf fiber in Bangladesh. I love that it has multiple purposes for functional use (such as shopping or a picnic), but also makes for great home decor!  The leather straps are beautiful, and the basket is sturdy.

 

 

the story:

Ten Thousand Villages is committed to being a pioneer in the #livelifefair movement through fair wages, good working conditions, long-term partnerships with the communities where their products are made, and eco-consciousness.  Since its founding in 1946, Ten Thousand Villages has generated $140 million in sustainable income for artisans in developing countries who would otherwise be unemployed. 

 

 

 

 

  Photo by Ten Thousand Villages

Photo by Ten Thousand Villages